• 46% of architects admit to having limited or poor knowledge of physical security design
  • 34% have had no training whatsoever in physical security design
  • Nearly a third (30%) of architects haven’t heard of LPCB’s LPS 1175, PAS or Secured by Design
  • Three-quarters of architects believe budget constraints lead to cutting corners with physical security

Jacksons Fencing, UK perimeter security manufacturer and specialist, has released insights into architects’ views on security design, from its report ‘Setting the Standard for Security’.

The report highlights the need for more thorough security awareness and education within the architectural sector, whether through degrees or equivalent programmes, or CPD courses. Just 15% of architects say they have a thorough knowledge of physical security design, with the majority admitting to a limited or poor understanding.

Needs improvement

Despite 65% of architects having had training on designing physically secure buildings and sites, almost half (46%) admit to having a limited or poor knowledge of security design.

At the same time, a third (34%) have had no training whatsoever in physical security design, suggesting that physical security isn’t seen as a priority in training programmes. This knowledge gap could be a barrier to thorough integration of security in architectural design, and a reason why physical security is often a victim budget constraints.

Other challenges

Jacksons also collected the views of physical security decision makers within UK businesses, and found that 31% of companies have a reactive or passive approach to security, identifying and reviewing risks only after major incidents. A further one in ten (10%) have an indifferent approach, never prioritising risk assessments, suggesting that throughout the building life cycle, from planning through to maintenance, security does not seem to be considered a priority.

Passive and indifferent attitudes also seem to be reflected in the design phase, where 76% of architects say that budget constraints lead to downgrading specifications with physical security, implying that the lessons from Grenfell around corner cutting have not been put into practice.

Security from the start

When designed with security in mind, buildings can help reduce crime rates by up to 67%.It is encouraging that the majority (59%) of architects agree that physical security should be considered at the beginning or throughout design. There are still a fifth (21%) of architects, however, who say security consultants aren’t brought in until near the end of the design process or after it is already complete. A further 5% say consultants are not involved at any stage.

As part of the report, Erika Gemmell, Director at AJ100 firm Scott Brownrigg, comments: “Security and high-quality building design ideally would be tied together, just like what happened with sustainability measures over the past 15 years, creating an integrated aesthetic solution. In the past we’ve been very reactionary. This is starting to change, however, by designing security from the start, offering a much better solution.”

The report, ‘Setting the Standard for Security’, is available on Jacksons Fencing’s website - click GO TO SUPPLIER WEBSITE BELOW to download it. 


  • 46% of architects admit to having limited or poor knowledge of physical security design
  • 34% have had no training whatsoever in physical security design
  • Nearly a third (30%) of architects haven’t heard of LPCB’s LPS 1175, PAS or Secured by Design
  • Three-quarters of architects believe budget constraints lead to cutting corners with physical security

Jacksons Fencing, UK perimeter security manufacturer and specialist, has released insights into architects’ views on security design, from its report ‘Setting the Standard for Security’.

The report highlights the need for more thorough security awareness and education within the architectural sector, whether through degrees or equivalent programmes, or CPD courses. Just 15% of architects say they have a thorough knowledge of physical security design, with the majority admitting to a limited or poor understanding.

Needs improvement

Despite 65% of architects having had training on designing physically secure buildings and sites, almost half (46%) admit to having a limited or poor knowledge of security design.

At the same time, a third (34%) have had no training whatsoever in physical security design, suggesting that physical security isn’t seen as a priority in training programmes. This knowledge gap could be a barrier to thorough integration of security in architectural design, and a reason why physical security is often a victim budget constraints.

Other challenges

Jacksons also collected the views of physical security decision makers within UK businesses, and found that 31% of companies have a reactive or passive approach to security, identifying and reviewing risks only after major incidents. A further one in ten (10%) have an indifferent approach, never prioritising risk assessments, suggesting that throughout the building life cycle, from planning through to maintenance, security does not seem to be considered a priority.

Passive and indifferent attitudes also seem to be reflected in the design phase, where 76% of architects say that budget constraints lead to downgrading specifications with physical security, implying that the lessons from Grenfell around corner cutting have not been put into practice.

Security from the start

When designed with security in mind, buildings can help reduce crime rates by up to 67%.It is encouraging that the majority (59%) of architects agree that physical security should be considered at the beginning or throughout design. There are still a fifth (21%) of architects, however, who say security consultants aren’t brought in until near the end of the design process or after it is already complete. A further 5% say consultants are not involved at any stage.

As part of the report, Erika Gemmell, Director at AJ100 firm Scott Brownrigg, comments: “Security and high-quality building design ideally would be tied together, just like what happened with sustainability measures over the past 15 years, creating an integrated aesthetic solution. In the past we’ve been very reactionary. This is starting to change, however, by designing security from the start, offering a much better solution.”

The report, ‘Setting the Standard for Security’, is available on Jacksons Fencing’s website - click GO TO SUPPLIER WEBSITE BELOW to download it. 


 
 
 
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H S Jackson & Son (Fencing) Ltd
Stowting Common
Ashford
TN25 6BN
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