According to Ofcom's Communications Market Report 2017, 94% of the UK’s adult population, probably including yourself, now own a mobile phone. If you are using yours regularly there is a good chance you will be charging it on a daily basis; out of necessity. While phone technology has become ever smarter, the complacent use of mobile phone chargers has resulted in devastating headlines highlighting wholly avoidable charger fires. Concerned by the inconspicuous threat, North Wales Fire and Rescue Service released a chilling video which simulated the rapid inferno chargers can cause in less than 3 minutes.

Whatever the scale of the phone charger damage, culpability invariably rests with the individual and their device. But what happens when your organisation is accountable for the provision and maintenance of a compliant, charging solution and how can you ensure it is up to the job?

metroSTOR’s Terry Bedford looks at the growth in mobility scooter ownership and the challenges social landlords face in offering scooter owners accessible charging facilities that address fire risks.

Abundant mobility scooters

‘I am increasingly aware of how abundant mobility scooters have become. Now priced at around the £1000 mark, a mode of transport once reserved for the most severely impaired, has become something of a lifestyle choice for those, young and old, with less restricted mobility. This popularity has been backed up by research carried out by RICA which anticipates more than twice as many mobility scooters will be in service in 2017 compared to 2009. This trend shows no sign of slowing down with an estimated annual market growth of 5-10%.’

Compliant charging and storage facilities

‘Many mobility scooters will be stored in private households. However, I am acutely aware of concerned social landlords with a duty to meet the requirements of existing mobility scooter- owning tenants. The question currently being asked is not just whether they have the capacity to accommodate new scooter-owners but the means to still offer compliant charging and storage facilities for current residents.’

Future legislation

These concerns follow recommendations in a recent draft report on mobility scooters which could shape future legislation on fire safety with far-reaching repercussions for those who manage, give advice or enforce standards in multi-occupancy residential buildings.

Increased fire risk

The Mobility Scooter Guidance Draft, produced by NSHFSG and The Chief Fire Officers Association, acknowledges the increased fire risk of mobility scooters caused by the materials used in their construction and lithium iron phosphate batteries in their operation.

375°C within 3 minutes

The affects included intensity of heat, controlled fire testing compartment fires recorded a scooter temperature reaching 375°C within 3 minutes of ignition, and the quantity and density of toxic smoke; capable of filling a compartment and overwhelming an occupier before a fire is even noticed.

Deliberate ignition

While mobility scooters are often stored outside and not in a secured compound, resulting in deliberate ignition (of the 36 fires that the report covers, 24 were started deliberately), the production of hydrogen that all batteries can give off when charging cannot be ignored.

‘I was impressed by the scope of the report and its recommendation of compulsory compliant storage and charging requirements for mobility scooters, a few of which are listed below.’

  • Ensure that any storage area within a building is of at least 30 minutes’ fire resisting construction and has early warning systems available.
  • Restrict charging at night, from 8pm to 8am – this will reduce sleeping risks.
  • NO charging should occur on the means of escape.
  • Any External Storage solution should be full risk assessed and consider arson, location, fire spread, access/egress and maintenance.
  • Ensure that tenants have insurance cover and are maintaining the equipment in line with manufacturer recommendations.
  • Ensure any designated areas are maintained and are fit for purpose for storage and charging.

Charging solution

‘Working for metroSTOR, it is particularly satisfying to be able to provide the exact mobility scooter storage and charging solution that The Chief Fire Officers Association report recommends.’

‘This is not simple coincidence but the result of many years understanding and investing in the evolving needs of our customers and their tenants.’

‘Take a look at our cost-effective, fully compliant mobility scooter storage stations and our work across the UK with Stonewater PLC.

‘If you are interested in our product and services, contact me so I can get moving on the provision of safe mobility scooter storage and charging stations.‘


According to Ofcom's Communications Market Report 2017, 94% of the UK’s adult population, probably including yourself, now own a mobile phone. If you are using yours regularly there is a good chance you will be charging it on a daily basis; out of necessity. While phone technology has become ever smarter, the complacent use of mobile phone chargers has resulted in devastating headlines highlighting wholly avoidable charger fires. Concerned by the inconspicuous threat, North Wales Fire and Rescue Service released a chilling video which simulated the rapid inferno chargers can cause in less than 3 minutes.

Whatever the scale of the phone charger damage, culpability invariably rests with the individual and their device. But what happens when your organisation is accountable for the provision and maintenance of a compliant, charging solution and how can you ensure it is up to the job?

metroSTOR’s Terry Bedford looks at the growth in mobility scooter ownership and the challenges social landlords face in offering scooter owners accessible charging facilities that address fire risks.

Abundant mobility scooters

‘I am increasingly aware of how abundant mobility scooters have become. Now priced at around the £1000 mark, a mode of transport once reserved for the most severely impaired, has become something of a lifestyle choice for those, young and old, with less restricted mobility. This popularity has been backed up by research carried out by RICA which anticipates more than twice as many mobility scooters will be in service in 2017 compared to 2009. This trend shows no sign of slowing down with an estimated annual market growth of 5-10%.’

Compliant charging and storage facilities

‘Many mobility scooters will be stored in private households. However, I am acutely aware of concerned social landlords with a duty to meet the requirements of existing mobility scooter- owning tenants. The question currently being asked is not just whether they have the capacity to accommodate new scooter-owners but the means to still offer compliant charging and storage facilities for current residents.’

Future legislation

These concerns follow recommendations in a recent draft report on mobility scooters which could shape future legislation on fire safety with far-reaching repercussions for those who manage, give advice or enforce standards in multi-occupancy residential buildings.

Increased fire risk

The Mobility Scooter Guidance Draft, produced by NSHFSG and The Chief Fire Officers Association, acknowledges the increased fire risk of mobility scooters caused by the materials used in their construction and lithium iron phosphate batteries in their operation.

375°C within 3 minutes

The affects included intensity of heat, controlled fire testing compartment fires recorded a scooter temperature reaching 375°C within 3 minutes of ignition, and the quantity and density of toxic smoke; capable of filling a compartment and overwhelming an occupier before a fire is even noticed.

Deliberate ignition

While mobility scooters are often stored outside and not in a secured compound, resulting in deliberate ignition (of the 36 fires that the report covers, 24 were started deliberately), the production of hydrogen that all batteries can give off when charging cannot be ignored.

‘I was impressed by the scope of the report and its recommendation of compulsory compliant storage and charging requirements for mobility scooters, a few of which are listed below.’

  • Ensure that any storage area within a building is of at least 30 minutes’ fire resisting construction and has early warning systems available.
  • Restrict charging at night, from 8pm to 8am – this will reduce sleeping risks.
  • NO charging should occur on the means of escape.
  • Any External Storage solution should be full risk assessed and consider arson, location, fire spread, access/egress and maintenance.
  • Ensure that tenants have insurance cover and are maintaining the equipment in line with manufacturer recommendations.
  • Ensure any designated areas are maintained and are fit for purpose for storage and charging.

Charging solution

‘Working for metroSTOR, it is particularly satisfying to be able to provide the exact mobility scooter storage and charging solution that The Chief Fire Officers Association report recommends.’

‘This is not simple coincidence but the result of many years understanding and investing in the evolving needs of our customers and their tenants.’

‘Take a look at our cost-effective, fully compliant mobility scooter storage stations and our work across the UK with Stonewater PLC.

‘If you are interested in our product and services, contact me so I can get moving on the provision of safe mobility scooter storage and charging stations.‘


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