Ground Engineering, Hard Landscaping, Traffic Control, Leisure & Recreation, Soft Landscaping
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  • Introduction to swing barriers
    Swing barriers are used to control vehicle access to car parks, and commercial or industrial premises. A single or double swing arm can be specified, with two units typically able to span up to 12m. Swing gates are manually operated, and can be usually be locked. Normally they are designed to provide access control rather than impact protection...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to road blockers
    Road blockers provide a high level of security and protection, enabling access control and traffic management at the entrances to sensitive or vulnerable sites. They are especially suitable for military, government, infrastructure, distribution and airport locations. For counter terrorism and other high-security requirements, road blockers and...
    Guidance, 25 April 2017
  • Introduction to mechanical parking systems
    Traffic density and the availability of car parking space are key issues in developing public realm, private residential and commercial environments. Mechanical parking systems provide one way of making the best use of every square foot, and offer a creative approach to high capacity car storage. Automated or manned systems release extra space in...
    Guidance, 07 December 2012
  • Introduction to canopy shelters
    Canopy shelters provide shade and outdoor cover for school playgrounds, outdoor classrooms, sheltered play areas, and other leisure and hospitality developments. They come in diverse materials, designs and attractive shapes. Tensile fabric canopies have distinctive curved, arched, domed, conical or gull-wing configurations. They help to create...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to identity signs
    On high streets, in shopping malls, in retail emporia and on commercial enterprise parks, businesses compete fiercely for trade. Distinctive identity signs represent the front-end of designing for attention capture and brand recognition. Monoliths, or totems, are freestanding outdoor identity signs often positioned at the entrance to commercial...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to rockers / springers
    Rockers and springies are pieces of equipment that promote balance and active play, primarily for younger children. Single-seat springers often come in brightly coloured animal shapes and allow small children and toddlers to rock by themselves. Two- or four-way springers have more of a seesaw effect and let several friends play together. Sit-in...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to covered walkways
    Covered walkways protect pedestrians from inclement weather, providing shelter as they move to and from buildings. Covered walkways are typically provisioned at schools, hospitals, public buildings, supermarkets, retail centres, airports and other transport termini. Most designs are modular and can be used to construct walkways of different...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to water play
    Water play equipment can form popular attractions in playgrounds and parks, allowing children to experiment with natural elements like water, mud and sand. Various levels of sophistication are offered, from simple sand-and-water combinations that encourage free play; via systems incorporating funnels, dams, pumps, chutes and pipes; to interactive...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Introduction to utility posts / bollards
    Utility bollards provide temporary services in streets, squares, esplanades and parks. They are used when larger than normal numbers of people congregate in public spaces for markets, concerts or sports events. They can provide power, communications, water and air supplies. Retractable utility posts can be sunk into the ground when not in use...
    Guidance, 10 December 2012
  • Geogrids – a guidance article
    Geogrids are strong synthetic materials that reinforce, stabilise and protect the ground’s subsurface. They give a structure in which soil and aggregates gain purchase, spread loads across the sub-base, and can be used to cover voids. Civil engineers and landscape and building contractors install them during the construction of paved highways ...
    Guidance, 14 April 2018
  • Introduction to stormwater storage
    Stormwater storage modules can be used as attenuation units or soakaways. They are installed under the paved surfaces of car parks, commercial areas, residential developments and other hardstandings. They accommodate surface water runoff, providing source control as part of sustainable urban drainage schemes. Cellular stormwater management modules...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to tree grilles
    Tree grilles fit in paving schemes to secure tree roots, protect them from vehicle or pedestrian damage, and help irrigate them. They are used for tree protection and urban greening in commercial spaces and public landscapes, by roads and on pedestrianised concourses. Square and round frames and grids come in diverse geometrical patterns and...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to cigarette bins
    Cigarette bins, also referred to as Ash Bins, became popular with the enforcement of the smoking ban in Scotland in 2006, and in the rest of the UK in 2007. The smoking ban prohibits smoking in offices and other workplaces, as well as in public places, such as train stations, pubs, shopping centres and bus shelters. Cigarette bins are placed at...
    Guidance, 11 September 2017
  • Introduction to safer surfacing
    Impact-absorbing safety surfacing is installed in schoolyards, nurseries, playgrounds and parks, especially around play equipment that presents a risk of injury from falling. Critical fall height (CFH) is the term used to describe the maximum fall height from play equipment. The depth and area of surfacing required is determined by the CFH...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012
  • Introduction to pavilions
    While they draw on a classical architectural heritage, pavilions are more often associated with sociable local golf clubs, bustling scout huts, and ‘the sound of leather on willow on the village green’. That same sense of well-ordered leisure is harnessed by local authorities, schools, heritage organisations, sports clubs, leisure developments and...
    Guidance, 06 December 2012